When prophets need to know


I have a deep personal interest in the anticipated social response to the upcoming movie, 2012.  While it looks to be great entertainment from the fertile mind of Roland Emmerich, I am fascinated by the idea of how our society will react to some sort of a major catastrophic cataclysmic event like that depicted in the film.

I don’t go in for conspiracy theories that the government of the United States has a secret plan for the survival of the race.  I am certain that we have plans in place to ensure the continuity of the government in event of nuclear war or some other disaster, but the survival of the citizens of this country is a whole different matter.

A wise investment

As I get older, I take the idea of having a usable stockpile of food and water much more seriously than when I was younger.  We have dipped into our food storage several times over the past few years as the grip of a tight economy has reached into our personal finances.  But I value my food storage for a different reason.

I am convinced that the day will come, in my lifetime, that we will not be able to leave our homes for extended periods of time in order to go out and buy food.  It could be due to a flu pandemic or perhaps social unrest, but I am more inclined to think that it will be from some sort of a plague that will keep us indoors for weeks.

A prophecy of plagues

Now there’s a word that you don’t hear thrown around much these days.  Do I mean a plague like the kind that decimated Europe during the middle ages?  No.  How about a plague like the kind that caused so many deaths at the end of World War I – the 1918 flu pandemic?  No, I’m thinking of a different kind of plague.

Perhaps turning to the scriptures will bring it to a better light.  Let’s take a look at Revelations chapter eight. There are several references to plagues contained in the next few chapters but verse seven describes the beginning of the plague to which I refer now.  What things fall to the earth when the first angel sounds his trumpet?

Hail and fire and blood

I’ve written about this previously, but my interpretation of the phrase, “hail and fire mingled with blood” is this:  The hail is actually small stones or meteorites.  The fire is a sticky, burning petroleum-like fluid found in the tail of comets. It is also known as naphtha, a volatile and flammable liquid mixture of hydrocarbons.

The blood is a description of water of the earth mixed with a red dust that is some form of ferric oxide.  This red dust is water soluble, looks just like blood when it hits the water, and is highly toxic to life.  In addition, it is irritating to the skin and can cause a plague of microbes, insects and vermin to rapidly propagate in heat.

Writings of Anthony Larson

If this all sounds familiar, then you have read either the works of David Talbott, Immanuel Velikovsky or my friend and fellow blogger, Anthony Larson.  My wife and I met with Anthony last week to talk about collaborating on a book idea that has been brewing in my head over the past little while as my wife has been recovering.

I like Anthony because he’s a bit of a controversial figure in the church.  He has written and published five books on the subject of the events of the very last days.  His explanations of the scriptures pertaining to the last days are not the orthodox and standard answers you will find in the commentaries of today’s LDS scholars.

The prophecy trilogy

In fact, his writings have been denounced by scientists at our religious institutions of higher learning, such as BYU.  That doesn’t deter me.  I’m grateful for the gift of agency and the fact that the Lord allows us to choose what we want to believe about the scriptures, even if they don’t jive with conventional accepted teachings.

Is this a dangerous approach to learning?  I don’t think so.  The Lord tells us to prove all things and hold fast to that which is good.  I have been pondering what I have read in Anthony’s books for about twenty-five years since I first read his prophecy trilogy back in the 1980’s.  I have also prayed about what he has written.

Other inspired men

Now that may seem a little odd, different or downright dangerous in our LDS culture.  Why would you pray about what someone has written who is not a general authority?  Why, that’s unthinkable, preposterous even! Don’t you know that you are on the road to apostasy if you listen to someone besides an apostle?

Yes, men can be deceived and we can all point to examples throughout history where good people have been proven fools to follow after the interpretations of the scriptures by men who were not authorized to speak on behalf of the Lord.  But that brings up an interesting question that I wonder if you have ever considered.

Some prophets are experts

Where do prophets turn when they need to know something about which they are not experts?  For example, when our apostles want to know facts about something in the medical world, I’ll bet they consult with Russell M. Nelson, another of our apostles who just happens to be a medical doctor and renowned heart surgeon.

When they want to know something about the interpretation of law, there are several excellent choices among Elder Oaks, Elder Cook or Elder Christofferson.  For nuclear physics, they turn to Elder Scott.  For managing a university, we have President Eyring, Elder Oaks, Elder Holland and Elder Bednar, all great educators.

Turning to the experts

But what do they do when they want to understand astrophysics?  To whom do the Brethren turn when they need help interpreting and explaining the events that are starting to concern and even frighten more and more of the world’s population, as the end times draw to a close?  Who will help our leaders explain all these things?

Why, they turn to the professors of astronomy at BYU of course.  Or, if they’re not particularly fans of that institution – gasp! – then they turn to the smaller faculty at the University of Utah.  I’m sure there are a myriad of faithful LDS scientists who can provide the needed background to explain meteorites and other scary things.

Turning to the Lord

You may ask, “Can’t they just turn to the Lord in prayer and receive the necessary knowledge to guide the people when the catastrophes that are prophesied to happen begin to come to pass in earnest?”  Of course you know they can.  The Lord can and will “do nothing but he revealeth his secret to his servants the prophets.”

But we are taught and believe that the Lord requires us to do our homework before he confirms to our hearts and minds that what we have studied and determined on a given subject is correct.  The apostles are no different from you and me when it comes to the right to receive revelation, though they understand the process better.

Experts can be wrong

The problem with turning to the experts in Astrophysics is that the most of them do not subscribe to the views of ancient prophets on the subject of how the planets and stars behave.  Things were different back then and there is no written record of how things really were.  They prefer to use current observations for their facts.

Yes, the idea that the heavens have always been the way we see them now is very much in vogue even among our LDS scientists.  The idea that the planets in our solar system could have once been in a different configuration sometime within the last four thousand years even is unthinkable and has no scientific basis for proof.

Summary and conclusion

Yep, Tim’s gone off his rocker.  He is claiming that scientists are wrong.  He’s gone off the deep end and thrown his cap in with the crowd of crazies who believe in planet X and that 2012 is the end of the world.  No, I don’t believe that, but I do believe that Anthony Larson has made more sense of things than most scientists.

So until an apostle or prophet comes out and says that Anthony Larson is wrong in his interpretation of the scriptures, I have decided to join forces with him and have committed to write and publish a work of fiction based on his research.  Call me crazy but I’m looking forward to the ride.  Stay tuned for the exciting adventures.

10 Responses

  1. [...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by LDS Blogs and Tim Malone, Tim Malone. Tim Malone said: Has Tim gone off his rocker? He has committed to write a book of fiction based on the works of Anthony Larson. http://bit.ly/1vXKf1 [...]

    Like

  2. An interesting post! I see nothing wrong with looking into something even when conventional science and other members seem to denounce it.

    I also love what you have said about prophets and apostles and the need for all of us to do our homework. I have kept such in mind as I have studied out what is called the theory of the NWO and secret combinations in the government (I also want to learn more about constitutional law).

    Thanks for sharing your words, and I look forward to reading what you produce!
    Your previous story on here was neat!

    Like

  3. I sure have enjoyed your blog! It is so nice to know of others who appreciate Anthony Larson’s work. They have bettered my scripture study, gospel understanding, and love for my faith. I would LOVE to read anything the two of you collaborate on so I’m staying tuned and looking forward to those exciting adventures!

    Like

  4. I’m not too crazy about the blood from heaven. It that explainable?

    Like

  5. Tim said: “So until an apostle or prophet comes out and says that Anthony Larson is wrong in his interpretation of the scriptures, I have decided to join forces with him and have committed to write and publish a work of fiction based on his research.”

    And I say: Yay!!!!!!!!!!! :)

    Like

  6. Tim–

    Sounds like a fun project. I like your approach to the fringe thinkers in our faith. I don’t know much about Bro Larson. You’ve peeked my interest, I think I’ll check his blog out.

    I hope your wife’s recovery continues going well.

    Like

  7. From a speech given at BYU in 1980 by ETB called “Fourteen Fundamentals in Following the Prophet” he said the following.

    Fifth: The prophet is not required to have any particular earthly training or diplomas to speak on any subject or act on any matter at any time.
    Sometimes there are those who feel their earthly knowledge on a certain subject is superior to the heavenly knowledge which God gives to his prophet on the same subject. They feel the prophet must have the same earthly credentials or training which they have had before they will accept anything the prophet has to say that might contradict their earthly schooling. How much earthly schooling did Joseph Smith have? Yet he gave revelations on all kinds of subjects. We haven’t yet had a prophet who earned a doctorate degree in any subject. We encourage earthly knowledge in many areas, but remember if there is ever a conflict between earthly knowledge and the words of the prophet, you stand with the prophet and you’ll be blessed and time will show you have done the right thing.

    Does this conflict with your “Some prophets are experts” paragraph?

    BTW Tim, if you are ever awake after midnight and can’t sleep, there is a radio program you will like. You might eben find some kindred spirits on it. Its call “Coast To Coast AM” with George Noory. Check out his web site here. http://www.coasttocoastam.com/

    Like

  8. Tim, I like the idea that you present here about the Prophets needing to do their homework, too. Especially I like to put that next to ETB’s Fourteen Fundamentals.

    Now, I wouldn’t want to disagree with with a Prophet, but then I also firmly believe, that some of what they say is stuff that they have understood from their secular learning/cultural upbringing. Thus, not necessarily revelation as such.

    Ergo, I don’t hang my salvation on certain ideas of Origins of Man or Seven Deadly Heresies (to name a couple of controversial subjects). When in doubt, I will follow the Prophets, but I try to do my homework, too.

    In my homework I have come to the conclusion, that the Prophets are not talking idle talk when they tell us to get our house in order, and to be prepared to be unable to go shopping for a while. I don’t spend much time thinking how it could happen, but some ideas that you bounce around sound plausible. There are more scenarios that could be added to them, I’m sure.

    I think we would not have scriptures like D&C 88:78-80 if secular learning were not important, too. As long as there’s balance, I guess there is quite a lot of wiggle room within the gospel framework for us to form our world view.

    I enjoy your posts.

    Like

  9. Hey Tim – I think I’ve read this post before, but it made me think of the vision given to a man from the Book of Plagues. I don’t think this refutes your thoughts above at all, but thought it significant enough to point you to it. Let me know what you think.

    Greg

    Like

  10. Hey Tim!
    I was really struck by that 2012 movie. I reccomend it!
    I talked about some of the things that stuck out to me in that film as well as another movie on my blog if you care to look!

    God Bless.

    Like

Comments are closed.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,640 other followers

%d bloggers like this: